Autumn Healthful and Healing Recipe: Vitamin Soup

Eating certain foods for health and healing is an important part of caring for yourself. In this season, when so many fall victim to illness, it is important to have these healing soup recipes on hand. Eating in season follows the rhythm and cycle of nature; all of which is given for our vitality.


Autumn root vegetables are not only packed with vitamins and minerals needed for cold and flu prevention/treatment; but they are in season and very inexpensive this time of year.

1)Carrots – Carrots are loaded with beta carotene. They are very low in saturated fat and cholesterol. Carrots are an excellent source of vitamin B6, thiamine, niacin, folate, manganese, vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin K, potassium, and a very good source of dietary fiber.
2)Potatoes - Potatoes are a good source of fiber and naturally low in cholesterol. They are high in vitamins and minerals. In fact, potatoes contain approximately 70% of the daily recommended value of vitamin C and are a good source of iron.
3)Parsnips - Parsnips are very low in saturated fat and cholesterol. They are a good source of potassium, vitamin C, folate, manganese, and dietary fiber.
4)Rutabagas/Turnips - The turnip is a non-starchy vegetable and adds a significant amount of vitamin C to the diet.
5)Pumpkin – Pumpkin is a good source of vitamin E, vitamin B6, niacin, thiamin, folate, magnesium, iron, phosphorus, and it is very good source of dietary fiber. It is also an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium, riboflavin, copper and manganese.

Herbs such as summer savory, thyme, and parsley have purifying properties and are high in calcium and vitamins C and A.

Note: It is always a good idea to have homemade chicken stock on hand, and the meat reserved in the refrigerator, ready for immediate use throughout the week.

The following traditional recipes use seasonal foods well known for their ability to restore health.

Vitamin Soup

-1 cup dried beans (I like small navy beans)
-2 cups diced carrots
-2 cups diced potatoes
-2 cups diced parsnips
-1 cup diced rutabaga (turnip)
-2 onions, chopped
-2 tsp. dried savory
-1/2 tsp. dried thyme
-1/2 cup fresh or frozen parsley, chopped
-2 cups cooked diced pastured chicken (optional)
-1 cup grated zucchini or pumpkin

Directions: Soak dried beans in water for at least 8 hours or overnight. Fill crock pot 1/3 full with homemade chicken bone broth or Vegetable Bouillon (see recipe below). Add remainder of the ingredients, except for the herbs. Let simmer on high until beans and vegetables are tender (6-8 hours). Add the herbs for the last 30 minutes of cooking.

Note: You may not have homemade bone broth on hand or you may hold to a more vegetarian/vegan diet. Either way, add a boost of nutrition to the above recipe by using this Vegetable Bouillon instead.

Vegetable Bouillon

-5 cloves of garlic
-4 onions
-4 stalks celery
-6 carrots
-A handful of spinach or kale leaves
-4 tomatoes
-2 tablespoons parsley
-1 teaspoon thyme
-2 teaspoons savory

Directions: Fill a large stock pot with pure water. Add all ingredients and simmer until vegetables are tender. Strain using a piece of cheesecloth (our hens love the leftover vegetable pulp). Store in glass jars in refrigerator for use in the short-term (2-3 days) or freeze for a longer storage solution.

Please comment and share with us what kinds of healthful and healing foods you traditionally make this time of year?

Pin It
You can see this post and a host of others here: Real Food Wednesdays, Healthy 2day Wednesday, Homemaking Wednesday, Naptime Creations, Pennywise Platter Thursday, Simple Lives Thursday, It’s a Keeper, Fresh Bites Friday, Fight Back Friday, Foodie Friday, Sunday Night Soup Night, Mangia Mondays, Traditional Tuesdays, Recipe Exchange, Melt in Your Mouth Monday

Disclaimer: The statements made here have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. These statements are not intended to diagnose, treat or cure or prevent any disease. This notice is required by the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act.

Comments

  1. suzyhomemaker says:

    This soup looks good. I know you put chicken as optional, but it is so important to have fat in order to absorb all the vitamins you are talking about. If you leave out the chicken there might not be enough fat. Just so others know :)

  2. Nice, we love both root vegetables & soup. I like to add astragalus root & garlic to the broth.

  3. Medifast Coupons says:

    We have a cold bug that is circling presently in my house and I think your Vitamin Soup is going to be just what we need to beat it. Thanks for sharing and wish me luck.

  4. Treasures Evermore says:

    Oh this sounds wonderful and my favourite spice is summer savory. I've been fighting a flu, maybe time to make this.

    Thank you for the recipe.
    Connie

  5. Rachel @ day2day joys says:

    Yummy! This recipe looks very healthy & satisfying! I love that it is soup "season"!

    Thanks for sharing at Healthy 2day Wednesdays!

  6. Debbie @ Easy Natural Food says:

    What a great name, Vitamin Soup! I'm going to be hosting a blog carnival specifically for soups, stocks and chowders, starting this Sunday. I would love it if you would come over and post this recipe. Here's a link with more info.

    http://easynaturalfood.com/2011/10/17/introducing-sunday-night-soup-night/

    I hope to see you there!
    Debbie

  7. Andrea @ Frugally Sustainable says:

    Thank for the invite Debbie:) Sounds amazing! What a great idea. I'll be there!

  8. Jo's Health Corner/www.naturallysports.com says:

    What a great recipe! I grew up eating lots of soup made of root vegetables during the long winters in Sweden.

  9. Debbie @ Easy Natural Food says:

    Hi Andrea, thanks for being part of Sunday Night Soup Night! You have some great recipes, can't wait to see what you come up with next :)

  10. Anybody have any suggestions on how to get toddlers to eat soup? I have been just putting it over rice and the rice absorbs a decent amount of broth. My children are impossible to feed :)

  11. Hi,
    This sounds great and I can’t wait to try it. One question, you said 1 C grated zucchini or pumpkin. I love pumpkin and want to know how you grate it when its still in the original pumpkin shape? Thanks!

Mountain Rose Herbs

Speak Your Mind

*